Growing Pains: Problems with Puberty Suppression in Treating Gender Dysphoria (USA)

In a recently published paper in The New Atlantis titled “Growing Pains: Problems with Puberty Suppression in Treating Gender Dysphoria,” authors Paul W. Hruz, Lawrence S. Mayer, and Paul R. McHugh argue that “the evidence for the safety and efficacy of puberty suppression is thin, based more on the subjective judgments of clinicians than on rigorous empirical evidence. It is, in this sense, still experimental — yet it is an experiment being conducted in an uncontrolled and unsystematic manner.”

According to the authors, “The claim that puberty-blocking treatments are fully reversible makes them appear less drastic, but this claim is not supported by scientific evidence. It remains unknown whether or not ordinary sex-typical puberty will resume following the suppression of puberty in patients with gender dysphoria. It is also unclear whether children would be able to develop normal reproductive functions if they were to withdraw from puberty suppression. It likewise remains unclear whether bone and muscle development will proceed normally for these children if they resume puberty as their biological sex. Furthermore, we do not fully understand the psychological consequences of using puberty suppression to treat young people with gender dysphoria.”

“Physicians should be cautious about embracing experimental therapies in general, but especially those intended for children, and should particularly avoid any experimental therapy that has virtually no scientific evidence of effectiveness or safety. Regardless of the good intentions of the physicians and parents, to expose young people to such treatments is to endanger them.”

Read the full paper here:  Growing Pains: Problems with Puberty Suppression in Treating Gender Dysphoria — The New Atlantis

Hormone therapy is a horrible risk for kids — New York Post