Riley Del Rey (USA)

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Riley Del Rey, a man who identifies as a transgender woman, claims he was fired from an internship with the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute (“CHCI”), under the leadership of Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham, in 2015 “because [he] is transgender.”

Del Rey alleges he was terminated the same day the his supervisors told him “they had received information that caught them ‘off guard'” and that he “believes staff in the congresswoman’s office had just become aware that [he] is transgender.”

Del Rey “says [he] is raising the allegations now … because of a slew of stories in the news about sexual harassment and discrimination in the workplace” and that “the views of transgender people” are “missing in the nationwide debate.” No one here is surprised; we already know men tend to feel left out when conversations aren’t all about them.

Transgender woman alleges discrimination at Rep. Lujan Grisham’s office

 

Doe v. Trump (USA)

On Monday, December 11 U.S. District Court Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly issued a ruling in Doe v. Trump denying “the Trump administration’s request to delay an order requiring the military to begin accepting transgender recruits starting January 1.”

Judge Kollar-Kotelly wrote, “The Court is not persuaded that Defendants will be irreparably injured by” the January 1 deadline. The Pentagon has announced “it will begin processing transgender applicants to the military on January 1.”

The Department of Justice appealed the ruling late Monday, arguing implementing “a significant change” to military standards would “place extraordinary burdens on our armed forces and may harm military readiness.”

DOJ appeals ruling that transgender people are free to enlist in US military — CNN

Judge rules transgender people can enlist in military, denying Trump bid to delay deadline — Washington Post

 

 

 

Sarah (Anthony) Fadich (USA)

Sarah (formerly known as Anthony) Fadich is a man who identifies as a woman who claims his ex-wife “continues to boldly and maliciously use her incorrect name and pronouns causing tremendous confusion and distress to the kids.” He filed a motion seeking to compel her to use “correct and legal name and gender pronouns” when referring to him, which the court denied, citing her first amendment right to free speech. He then filed a second motion, again seeking to force his ex-wife to validate his gender identity, claiming “the only way to fight this abuse, discrimination, and injustice is to take the battle to the court room and hold the legal system accountable.”

Additionally, he’s seeking to use his position as a veteran and a transgender “mother” to fundraise his “fight to simply observe [his] custodial parental rights” and making the absurd assertion that his “kids’ emotional and psychological safety” is in jeopardy because they are not forced to refer to him as their “mother.” Apparently he thought it would be appropriate to post their photo on the internet and make public accusations against their mother (such as blaming her for “psychologically manipulating” them, “prevent[ing]their healing, prolong[ing] their suffering, and ensur[ing] that they harbor bitterness and blame towards Sarah”) in an attempt to raise money to fund his lawsuit. Shameful.

 

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New Hampshire H.B. 1319 (USA)

On November 7, New Hampshire Senator Ed Butler introduced H.B. 1319, “An Act prohibiting discrimination based on gender identity,” which, if passed, would add “gender identity” to the state’s existing anti-discrimination laws. The bill defines “gender identity” as “a person’s gender-related identity, appearance, or behavior” and specifies “gender-related identity may be shown by providing evidence including, but not limited to, medical history, care or treatment of the gender-related identity, consistent and uniform assertion of the gender-related identity, or any other evidence that the gender-related identity is sincerely held as part of a person’s core identity provided, however, that gender-related identity shall not be asserted for any improper purpose.”

Read the full text here: New Hampshire H.B. 1319

Gabrielle Bouchard (Canada)

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Gabrielle Bouchard, a man who identifies as a woman, has been elected to serve as president of the Fédération des femmes du Québec (FFQ), Quebec’s main women’s federation.

Bouchard, who ran unopposed, recognizes that “some women are really, really, not happy” that a male individual has been elected to lead a women’s rights organization.

The FFQ’s mission includes the aim to “deconstruct and eliminate patriarchy and all the other systems of oppression or domination with which it is intertwined, such as capitalism, racism, imperialism, heterosexism, colonialism.”

Quebec women’s federation chooses first trans leader

Bruce v. South Dakota (USA)

On October 13, Terri Bruce, a transgender man, filed a federal lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the District of South Dakota, Western Division, alleging the South Dakota State Employee Health Plan “singles out transgender employees for unequal treatment by categorically depriving them of all medical care for gender dysphoria, regardless of whether those treatments are medically necessary under accepted standards of care” in violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.

Bruce, who is represented by the ACLU, claims the state health plan declined to cover a mastectomy due to the categorical exclusion of “services or drugs related to gender transformations,” however, a mastectomy would be covered for an individual who “had been assigned male at birth and [was] experiencing clinically significant psychological distress from the size of his breasts … as medically necessary”

In its answer, the state admits mastectomy as medically necessary is covered under the health plan, subject to the specific exclusion of coverage for “services or drugs related to gender transformations,” but that “whether there is a legitimate medical justification for the exclusion is the subject of an existing dispute in the medical field.”

State of South Dakota sued over transgender health policy

State denies plan discriminates against transgender members

Nova Maday v. Township High School District 211 (USA)

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On November 30, Nova Maday, an 18-year-old male who identifies as a girl, filed a lawsuit in Cook County Circuit Court seeking access to the girls’ locker room at Palatine High School in Palatine, Illinois. The lawsuit claims Township High School District 211 (“the district”) “violat[ed] the Illinois Human Rights Act by treating her differently than other girls solely because she is transgender,” referring to the district’s refusal to allow Maday access to the girls’ locker room. Maday is the second transgender student to sue the district for access to the girls’ locker room. In 2015, the district settled a lawsuit filed by the U.S Department of Education and the ACLU on behalf of a transgender student allowing that student access to the girls’ locker rooms within a private changing area.

Maday, who is also represented by the ACLU of Illinois, claims the district “refused, withheld from, and denied Nova the full and equal enjoyment of its facilities, namely the girls’ locker rooms, based on her gender-related identity” in violation of the Illinois Human Rights Act. The complaint admits Maday agreed to use “the private restroom in the nurse’s office to change for P.E. class” but also claims doing so caused “anxiety, depression, and worsening of her gender dysphoria” and that as a result “her P.E. grade rapidly declined.” The complaint states, “The District’s actions signal to Nova that she is not really a girl and should feel ashamed of who she is and about her body, in particular.” Maday seeks “an order directing [the district] to cease and desist from discriminating on the basis of gender-related identity by refusing transgender students, including but not limited to Nova, to use the locker rooms consistent with their gender identity” as well as “actual damages, including damages for emotional distress.”

Lawsuit: 2nd transgender student fights for locker room access at Palatine district — Chicago Tribune

Transgender student sues Illinois district over locker room — Fox News